Show Menu

Agile Design for Learning Systems Cheat Sheet by

design     agile     leaerning

Introd­uction

Software design and related practices and methods have had a signif­icant influence over the Instru­ctional Design field. For example, ADDIE, Dick and Carey, and Rapid Protot­yping are heavily influenced by software develo­pment method­ologies (Rawst­horne, 2005).

Software design method­ology is now going through another paradigm shift — Agile Design. And rather than being a method­ology, it is more a philosophy or ethos that is best described by its manifesto (Agile Alliance, 2001):

 ­ ­"We are uncovering better ways of developing software by doing it and helping others do it. Through this work, we have come to value:

 ­ ­In­div­iduals and intera­ctions over processes and tools
 ­ ­Wo­rking software over compre­hensive docume­nta­tion
 ­ ­Cu­stomer collab­oration over contract negoti­ation
 ­ ­Re­spo­nding to change over following a plan

 ­ ­That is, while there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more."

Agile Approach

The Agile approach recognizes the need for collab­ora­tion, faster design solutions, feedback, and continuous improv­ement for producing business value in our ever faster and more networked society. For learning profes­sionals to keep pace with the rest of the organi­zation, Agile Design can be adapted to fit the needs of the learning and training community by providing an ethos for the design of learning:

 ­ ­"We are uncovering better ways of designing learning processes by doing it and helping others do it. Through this work, we have come to value:

 ­ ­In­div­iduals and intera­ctions over processes and tools
 ­ ­So­lutions that promote and speed the develo­pment of learning processes over compre­hensive docume­nta­tion
 ­ ­Cu­stomer collab­oration over contract and formal negoti­ation
 ­ ­Re­spo­nding to change over following a plan

 ­ ­That is, while there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more."
 

Values and Principles of Agile Design

Agile is a more of a philos­ophy, it has values and principles that guide its practices. The Sidky Agile Measur­ement Index (SAMI), developed by Sidky and Arthur (2008), is probably the most widely used method for guiding Agile princi­ples. It is composed of five values: commun­ica­tion, collab­ora­tion, evolut­ionary, integr­ated, and encomp­assing. These three of Malcolm Gladwell’s ideas in The Tipping Point heavily inspired the five values:
People: Commun­ication and collab­ora­tion
Message: Evolut­ionary, integr­ated, and adaptive
Suitable enviro­nment: All encomp­ass­ing
The five values with their descri­ptions (descr­iptions have been adapted to fit learning design rather than software develo­pment):
Encompassing: Establ­ishing a vibrant and all-en­com­passing learning enviro­nment to sustain agility
Adaptive: Responding to change through multiple levels of feedback
Integrated: Developing high quality learning solutions in an efficient and integrated manner
Evolutionary: Delivering learning processes and platforms early and contin­uously
Collaborative: Enhanced commun­ication and collab­oration

Five Tight Principles

The Agile Manifesto outlines twelve princi­ples; however, Sidky and Arthur (2008) discovered they could group them into five tight principles (the descri­ptions have been adapted to describe learning design rather than software develo­pment):
Embrace change to deliver customer value
Plan and deliver learning processes and platforms frequently
Human centric
Technical excellence
Collaboration with business people

The Four Essences of Agile Design

1. Self-o­rga­nizing teams collab­orate to ensure the values and principles of Agile Learning Design are upheld to bring value to the organi­zation or business.
2. An apprec­iation for adapta­bility and flexib­ility that brings small changes over the long term, rather than the uncert­ainty of prediction that waterfall or linear design methods impose.
3. Iterative design methods that are based on real world experience and research.
4. Customer involv­ement and collab­ora­tion from start to end to ensure their needs are met to the fullest.

Adaptive vs. Predictive in Agile Design

These value and principles make Agile more adaptive rather than predic­tive; and people­-or­iented rather than proces­s-o­riented (Fowler, 2003). However, it is misleading to view it on the opposite end of a spectrum from a plan-d­riven or discip­lined method as it implies that agile methods are unplanned or undisc­ipl­ined. A more accurate distin­ction is that methods exist on a continuum from adaptive to predictive and agile methods lie on the adaptive side of this continuum (Boehm, Turner, 2004).

Download the Agile Design for Learning Systems Cheat Sheet

1 Page
//media.cheatography.com/storage/thumb/davidpol_agile-design-for-learning-systems.750.jpg

PDF (recommended)

Alternative Downloads

Share This Cheat Sheet!

 

Comments

No comments yet. Add yours below!

Add a Comment

Your Comment

Please enter your name.

    Please enter your email address

      Please enter your Comment.

          Related Cheat Sheets

          CSS2 Cheat Sheet
          JavaScript Cheat Sheet

          More Cheat Sheets by Davidpol

          Brainwriting Cheat Sheet