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Compulsive Hoarding Cheat Sheet by

Compulsive Hoarding
health     healthcare     mental     compulsive     hoarding

Introd­uction

Here, then, are ten things you should know about hoarding. Much of the inform­ation was taken from the research of Gerald Nestadt, M.D., M.P.H and Jack Samuels, Ph.D. of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Ten Things to Know

1. Compulsive hoarding affects approx­imately 700,000 to 1.4 million people in the US.

2. Compulsive hoarding is often considered a form of Obsess­ive­-Co­mpu­lsive Disorder (OCD) because between 18 and 42 percent of people with OCD experience some compulsion to hoard. However, compulsive hoarding can affect people who don’t have OCD.

3. The OCD Collab­orative Genetics Study reported that genetic linkage findings are different in OCD families with and without hoarding behavior, suggesting that a region on chromosome 14 is linked with compulsive hoarding behavior in these families and that hoarding is a distinct genetic subtype of OCD.

4. The compulsion to hoard often starts during childhood or the teen years, but doesn’t usually become severe until adulthood.

5. Hoarding can be more about fear of throwing something away than about collection or saving. Thinking about discarding an item triggers anxiety in the hoarder, so she hangs on to the item to prevent angst.

6. Many hoarders are perfec­tio­nists. They fear making the wrong decision about what to keep and what to throw out, so they keep everyt­hing.

7. Hoarding often runs in families and can frequently accompany other mental health disorders, like depres­sion, social anxiety, bipolar disorder, and impulse control problems. A majority of people with compulsive hoarding can identify another family member who has the problem.

8. Compulsive hoarders rarely recognize their problem. Generally, only after the hoarding becomes a problem with other family members is the problem discussed.

9. Compulsive hoarding can be difficult to control. It is usually treated in the same way OCD is. However, compulsive hoarding doesn’t usually respond as well as other kinds of OCD.

10. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) may be more effective for compulsive hoarding than medica­tions, especially when it involves a therapist going into the home of the hoarder and helps her to develop habits and a consistent behavioral program to try to de-clutter her home, car, and life.
 

Are You a Compulsive Horder?

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