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Pain Assessment Cheat Sheet by

Assessing Pain in a Patient
assessment     medical     healthcare     pain     wilda

Accurate Assess­ments, best recomm­end­ations

The Pain Management Resource Team makes the most accurate and compre­hensive assessment possible to provide the best sugges­tions for treating pain. To assess pain consis­tently for each patient, team members use the WILDA method. It has five key compon­ents:
Words
Intensity
Location
Duration
Aggravating/Alleviating Factors

Words

How you describe your pain helps identify what type of pain you have. Team members will ask you questions to describe your pain.

1. What does your pain feel like?
2. What words would you use to describe the pain you are having?

If your pain is hard to describe, we can provide you with list of words that may help. These include:

Aching
Burning
Cramping
Cutting
Deep
Dull
Nagging
Numb
Piercing
Pressure
Radiating
Sharp
Shooting
Stabbing
Tender
Tingling
Throbbing
vUnbea­rable

Intensity

To help us gauge the intensity of your pain, we use both numbers and words.
Numeric Scale
For adult patients, we use a numeric scale of 0 to 10, where 0 means no pain and 10 is the worst possible pain.
1-3: Mild Pain
4-6: Moderate Pain
7-10: Severe Pain
A Pain Team member will ask you to rate your pain from 0 to 10. He or she also will ask you what your current pain level is, what the average is, and what the best and worst levels are.
 

Word Scale

We also use this list of words to rank from no pain to the worst possible pain.
None
Mild
Moderate
Severe
Excruciating
Worst Possible

Location

Because you may feel pain in one or more places on your body, it's important that you and your nurse or physician are talking about the same pain. Usually, Pain Team members will ask you to point to each specific location of your pain.

Aggrav­ati­ng/­All­evi­ating Factors

Pain Team members will ask you questions about what makes your pain better or worse. This includes treatments you may have received, such as pain-r­eli­eving medica­tions or massage, emotional changes or other hospital activi­ties.

Other Factors

The Pain Management Resource Team looks at other factors in assessing your pain. These include contri­buting symptoms or side effects associated with pain and its treatment.
Confusion
Constipation
Insomnia
Nausea
Sleepiness
Urinary Retention
Vomiting
Weakness
Some patients may tolerate these symptoms without aggressive treatment, while others may need help managing them. We can adjust or alter medica­tions when necessary.

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