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The 7 Types of ADD Cheat Sheet by

The 7 Types of Attention Deficit Disorder
add     healthcare     mental     disorder     attention     deficit     spect

Introd­uction

Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) is a national health crisis that continues to grow—yet it remains one of the most misund­erstood and incorr­ectly treated illnesses today.

While genetics, maternal alcohol or drug use, birth trauma, jaundice, brain infections and head trauma can play a causative role in ADD symptoms, the increase in people being diagnosed with it is likely related to influences in our world today that negatively affect brain function.

Type 1: Classic ADD

This first type of ADD is usually evident early in life. As babies, they tend to be colicky, active and wiggly. As children, they tend to be restless, noisy, talkative, impulsive and demanding. Their hypera­ctivity and confli­ct-­driven behavior gets everyone’s attention early on.Classic ADD is often called ADHD, with an emphasis on the hypera­ctive behavior trait. At the Amen Clinics, we do not use the term ADHD exclus­ively because not all of the ADD types are hypera­ctive.
SPECT scan findings show normal activity at rest, but during concen­tration there tends to be decreased activity in the underside of the prefrontal cortex, cerebellum and basal ganglia. The basal ganglia are structures deep within the brain that produce the neurot­ran­smitter dopamine; critical to motiva­tion, attention and setting the body’s idle speed.

Type 2: Inatte­ntive ADD

The second most common type. Those suffering with this type are usually quiet, more introv­erted and appear to daydream a lot. They may be labeled as unmoti­vat­ed—even slow or lazy. Inatte­ntive ADD is common but is often missed because children with this type tend to have fewer behavioral problems. They don’t draw the negative attention to themselves as do those with Classic ADD.
SPECT scan findings show normal activity at rest, but during concen­tration there tends to be decreased activity in the underside of the prefrontal cortex, cerebellum and basal ganglia.

Type 3: Overfo­cused ADD

In order to focus, it is necessary to contin­ually be able to shift your attention. People suffering with Overfo­cused ADD have most of the ADD features, but rather than not being able to pay attention, they have difficulty shifting their attention; they become hyper-­focused on certain things while tuning everything else out. These folks tend to get stuck or locked into negative thought patterns and behaviors. This type of ADD is often found in substance abusers as well as the children and grandc­hildren of alcoho­lics.
SPECT scan findings show increased activity at rest and during concen­tration in the anterior cingulate gyrus, as well as decreased activity in the underside of the prefrontal cortex, cerebellum and basal ganglia.
 

Type 4: Temporal Lobe ADD

People with this type of ADD have the hallmark features of ADD plus symptoms associated with temporal lobe problems, such as issues with learning, memory, mood instab­ility, aggres­sion, temper outbursts, and sometimes, even violence. It is not unusual to see this type of ADD in people who have had head injuries.
SPECT scan findings show decreased activity (and occasi­onally increased) activity in the temporal lobes at rest and during concen­tra­tion, as well as decreased activity in the underside of the prefrontal cortex, cerebellum and basal ganglia during concen­tra­tion.

Type 5: Limbic ADD

In Limbic ADD, the prefrontal cortex is undera­ctive during concen­tration while the deep limbic area—which sets your emotional tone, contro­lling how happy or sad you are—is overac­tiv­e.D­epr­ession is also associated with overac­tivity in the deep limbic area, yet a person’s develo­pmental history in addition to some subtle differ­ences on SPECT scans (between Limbic ADD and depres­sion) helps us differ­entiate between the two conditions so we can choose the best course of treatment to resolve symptoms.
SPECT scan findings typically show increased deep limbic activity at rest and during concen­tra­tion. There is also decreased activity in the prefrontal cortex, cerebellum and basal ganglia during concen­tra­tion.

Type 6: Ring of Fire ADD

A pattern of overall high activity in the brain. Suffers tend to have difficulty “turning off” their brains and typically feel overwh­elmed with thoughts and emotions. Suffers tend to do much worse on stimulant medica­tions alone.Ring of Fire ADD can be related to some form of allergy, infection or inflam­mation in the brain, or it can be related to bipolar disorder. There subtle differ­ences between Ring of Fire ADD and bipolar disorder in the scan data as well as some differ­ences in the presen­tation of a person’s symptoms.
SPECT Findings: Ring of Fire ADD SPECT scan findings show patchy increased activity in many areas of the brain, which looks like a “ring” of overac­tivity. We have found that there is some variab­ility in Ring of Fire patterns from individual to indivi­dual. In differ­ent­iating between bipolar and Ring of Fire ADD, it is important to consider the SPECT scan data in addition to the patient’s clinical history.

Type 7: Anxious ADD

There is low activity in the prefrontal cortex while there is over-a­ctivity in the basal ganglia, which sets the body’s “idle speed” and is related to anxiety. The ADD symptoms in people suffering with this type tend to be magnified by their anxiety. Treatment for people with Anxious ADD often includes both calming and stimul­ating the brain.
SPECT scan finding: show increased activity in the basal ganglia at rest and during concen­tra­tion. Additi­onally, there is decreased activity in the prefrontal cortex and cerebellum during concen­tra­tion.

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