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Early Modern 1450-1750 CE Cheat Sheet by

whap     worldhistory

Context

After the fall of post classical civili­zations
Western Europeans finally get their lives together
Coloni­zation begins

The Colombian Exchange

From the Americas
From Eurasia
Beans
Coffee Bean
Tobacco
Banana
Sweet Potato
Sugar cane
Coco
Livestock (cattle, sheep, pig, etc.)
Avocado
Small Pox
Pumpkin
Turkey
Wheat
Potato
Rice
Corn
Barley

The Renais­sance

New Changes
 
A rebirth of art, science, litera­ture, and thinking

Coerced Labor

Chattel Slavery
People are claimed as property
Indentured Servitude
Contracts are made
Encomienda System
Spaniards were granted a number of natives for labor as long as they were christ­ianized

Note Worthy Indivi­duals

Prince Henry
Found the Navigat school
Martin Luther
Founder of Protes­tantism and Luthernism
Cervantes
Author of Don Quixote
Newton
Renais­sance figure physicist
Gutenberg
Inventor of printing press
Suleiman
Ottoman Sultan

A quick Summary

STARTING WITH PRINCE HENRY, EUROPEANS ARE GOING TO TRAVEL THE WORLD AND BE IN EVERYB­ODY's BUSINESS.
THIS IS GOING TO MAKE THEM INCREDIBLY WEALTHY AND BUILD THEM HUGE EMPIRES.
ALONG WITH THIS, COMES DISEASE, SLAVERY, and HORRIBLE CONDITIONS FOR NATIVE AMERICANS.
THERE ARE ALSO HUGE LAND EMPIRES FROM THE OTTOMANS AND RUSSIANS OVER TO THE CHINESE.
THE COLOMBIAN EXCHANGE IS ARGUABLY THE MOST IMPORTANT THING EVER
 

Impacts of Columbian Exchange

European coloni­zation of the Americas led to the spread of diseases— including smallpox, measles, and influenza — that were endemic in the Eastern Hemisphere among Amerindian popula­tions and the uninte­ntional transfer of disease vectors, including mosquitoes and rats.
American foods (potatoes, maize, manioc) became staple crops in various parts of Europe, Asia, and Africa. Cash crops (sugar, tobacco) were grown primarily on planta­tions with coerced labor and were exported mostly to Europe and the Middle East in this period.
Afro-E­urasian fruit trees, grains, sugar, and domest­icated animals (horses, cattle, pigs) were brought by Europeans to the Americas, while other foods were brought by African slaves (okra, rice)
Popula­tions in Afro-E­urasia benefited nutrit­ionally from the increased diversity of American food crops.
European coloni­zation and the introd­uction of European agricu­lture and settle­ments practices in the Americas often affected the physical enviro­nment through defore­station and soil depletion.

Empires

Land Empires
Maritime Empires
Manchu Empire
Portuguese Empire
Mughal Empire
Spanish Empire
Ottoman Empire
Dutch Empire
Russian Empire
British Empire
 
French Empire

Note Worthy People

Galileo
Italian scientist
Peter the Great
Tsar of all the Russias
 

Global­izing Networks of Commun­cation

Techno­logical innova­tions made interc­onn­ection of the East and West hemisp­heres possible
 
Trade networks facili­tated spread of religion, and cultures
European techno­logical develo­pments in cartog­raphy and navigation built on previous knowledge developed in the Classical, Islamic, and Asian worlds.
 
The new global circul­ation of goods was facili­tated by royal chartered European monopoly companies and the flow of silver from the Spanish colonies in the Amerias to purchase Asian goods for the Atlantic markets. Regional markets continued to flourish in Afro-E­urasia by using establ­ished commercial practices and new transo­ceanic shipping services developed by European Merchants

Religious Changes

Existing Religi­ons
Sync­retic Religi­ons
Sufism
Vodun
Protes­tants
Sikhism

Note Worthy Indivi­duals

Sundiata
Founder of Mali Empire
Guru Nanak
1st guru of Sikhism
Akbar
Mughal Emperor
Louis XIV
Versailles Dweller
Shakes­peare
English playwright
Kangxi
Manchu­/Qing Emperor
Columbus
Spanish navigator and killer of native Americans
Wu Chengen
Author of Journey West

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